EASY MONEY TAXES

The 5 smartest things you can do with your tax refund

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Many of us are scrambling to get our paperwork in order to claim our tax refund as the April 30th tax filing deadline quickly approaches. The good news: The stress and anxiety of tax season is almost over.

More than two-thirds of Canadians will receive a refund of an average of $1,600 (*Cha-ching*) from the government. A number of different factors will determine the exact value of your reimbursement but thanks to free income tax calculator tools, like SimpleTax or TurboTax, you probably already have a good idea of what your tax refund will look like. Whether it’s a couple hundred dollars or in the 4-digit range, the question now becomes, “What do I do with my tax refund”?

Here are the top 5 ways to make the most of your tax refund.

Resist the urge to splurge.

Don’t fall into the trap of treating your tax refund like a winning lottery ticket. Go ahead and treat yourself to a little something like a nice meal out but some itches you should avoid scratching. As finance expert Suze Orman puts it, “Just because you can afford it doesn’t mean you should buy it.” A survey by Finder Canada found that 63% of Canadians make impulsive spending decisions on a yearly basis. A lack of careful decision making can result in buyer’s remorse so when tempted by an item with a hefty price tag, sit on it for a bit to avoid a guilty conscious. After all, your tax refund isn’t going anywhere.

Pay off your debt and pay-back your loans.

The average Canadian has nearly $30,000 in non-mortgage debt. This includes an average credit card balance of over $4,000. Many of us get by paying the minimum monthly payments, but since the average credit card interest rate hovers at 19%, it’s always better to pay sooner than later to avoid the high interest rates stacking up. Not only does debt put a dent in your wallet, debt can also have enormous emotional and psychological burdens. If you have debt, look at what you owe and pay back as much as you can. Prioritize ‘bad debt’ that incurs the highest rate of interest. By using your tax refund to pay off debt as quickly as possible, you’ll be one step closer to becoming debt-free.

Stash your cash in an emergency fund.

It’s easy to overlook the importance of an emergency fund when your finances are going well. With cash in the bank, it’s only natural to remain positive, which is perhaps why only 26% of Canadians have an emergency fund in place, with over a third of millenials having no emergency stash at all to offset unexpected financial difficulties. But the truth is you never know what the future holds. By putting some or all of your tax refund towards an emergency fund, you can be ready to tackle financial emergencies without going into debt.

Hack your life by investing in yourself.

Growing your knowledge and skills may give you a boost in self-confidence, but it can also provide great returns. You’re not only going to become more self-sufficient, but employers will find you more valuable, which means you can confidently negotiate a higher entry salary or ask for a raise. There are many affordable online courses you can take right now to expand your skill set. Not sure what skills will provide the best return on your investment in yourself? Check out this list of in-demand skills.

Save and invest towards a financial goal.

Whether you’re striving to meet a short-term financial goal like buying a new couch or a long-term one like buying a house, chances are that achieving your financial goals equates to saving money. Instead of placing the money from your tax refund under your mattress, start building towards your goals by saving your money into an investment account. By putting your money to work for you in a diversified investment portfolio that aligns with you financial profile, goals and risk tolerance, you’ll benefit from the forces of time and compound interest, and will likely reach your goal faster. Plus, you can reap the tax benefits of a TFSA or RRSP, depending on the type of goal you’re saving towards.

Pay it forward.

Donating to charity is not just a noble cause. It can also affect your bottom line. When you donate to one of Canada’s 86,000 registered charities, you can claim charitable tax credits or deductions with your official donation receipt. So why not do some good with your money from your tax refund, and in the process receive a little kickback from the government?

It can be difficult to decide what to do with your tax refund. When your instincts may be telling you “go spend!”,  reconsider what might be the best option for you given your financial situation and the financials goals you’re aiming for. Want to figure out what’s right for you? Drop us a message in our chat. We’re happy to help!